Celebrate diversity

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Top row, left to right: two Magtech .38 Special 158 grain LSWC; two DoubleTap .38 Special +P 158 grain hardcast LSWC; two Federal .357 Magnum 158 grain JSP.

Bottom row, left to right: two Federal .38 Special 158 grain LRN, two Federal Gold Medal 148 grain full WC.

All of these rounds could be fired from one gun; while revolvers may be old, their ability to perform many roles from self defense, hunting, and target shooting, is hard to match in a semi-auto pistol.

Classic Colts

Colt Cobra and Pocket 9

Top: Colt Cobra .38 Special
The Cobra is an aluminum framed revolver on Colt’s D-frame that was produced until 1981. Unlike its competitors from S&W, the Corbra (and Detective Special) are unique because of their six-shot capacity. Also, the cylinder rotates clockwise from the shooter’s perspective, unlike S&W and Ruger DA revos.

Bottom: Colt Pocket 9
The Pocket 9 was a single-stack 9mm before it was cool, and an early attempt from Colt to get back into the CCW game. The gun was eventually discontinued allegedly due to a patent infringement lawsuit from Kahr, and was never heavily produced. Today used models will fetch a hefty price as the gun has a cult following both with hipster CCW dudes and (of course) Colt collectors.

Unarmed people can be dangerous

Don’t believe the narrative when they tell you that someone is “unarmed.” Watch that whole video.

Little revolvers for big things

small revolvers for big things

“Size matters not. Look at me. Judge me by my size, do you? And well you should not.” From top to bottom: Ruger LCR-22 with Crimson Trace grips, used mostly for NPE and as a kit gun; Smith & Wesson 640 Pro Series .357 Magnum with Ergo Deltagrip, used as EDC pretty regularly; Smith & Wesson 638 Airweight .38 Special, just purchased and will likely be used as a BUG and for NPE; Ruger SP101 .357 Magnum Wiley Clapp, EDC; and last but not least a genuine Colt Cobra .38 Special, used for when I want to feel like Bud White.