Smith & Wesson

Gun Nuts Review: Smith & Wesson 638 .38 Special

Smith & Wesson 638 two page right side

2014 was the last year that the humble j-frame was a legitimate contender at the IDPA BUG Nationals. In early 2015, the rules were changed in order to make Back Up Gun a full on division, and to do that meant making it a mandatory six shot division. The justification for this was that classifying with a five shooter would have been a nightmare, and while that’s true, it’s sad that IDPA killed the only place where the old-school king of carry guns could play. With the rise of the 9mm pocket gun, what is to become of the humble Airweight?

Gun Nuts Review: Smith & Wesson M&P9 ultimate tactical edition

M&P9 with Crimson Trace and RMR

There is no doubt that pistols equipped with red dot sights are here to stay. That’s the future of handgun shooting, and while the technology isn’t quite 100% yet, for many shooters it’s an excellent solution. I’ve done a bit of work with dot equipped pistols in the past, but thought it was high time to commit some of that work to paper. Our initial test platform is a Smith & Wesson M&P9 with thumb safety that has had the slide milled to accept a Trijicon RMR and equipped with a Crimson Trace Railmaster Pro green laser/light.

Gun Nuts Reviews: Smith & Wesson 325PD

Smith & Wesson 325PD Right side

In the early to mid-2000s, everyone was screaming for lighter carry guns. For a number of reasons, Smith & Wesson decided it would be awesome to offer some of their very popular L-frame and N-frame models with scandium frames and titanium cylinders, resulting in wrist destroying magnums like the 329PD, chambered in .44 Magnum. Of course, the Smith N-frame lineup also includes the legendary 625, the .45 ACP moonclip revolver. It was only natural to make a scandium framed, titanium cylindered version of that, resulting in the gun you see today, the Smith & Wesson 325PD.

Pros and cons of carrying a moonclip revolver

S&W 986 9mm

There has been an uptick lately in the number of revolvers available that are chambered in traditional “semi-auto” cartridges. While some of them aren’t great, like the Rhino in .40, the recent offerings from S&W are pretty awesome. Especially the L-frame 986 pictured above. People have been asking me about carrying that gun, so here’s a quick look at some of the pros and cons of carrying a gun that uses moonclips.

Revolver Tour #8: Smith & Wesson 625

smith & wesson 625

This isn’t my first 625. It’s not my second, either. This gun marks the 3rd time I’ve saddled up for one of these N-frames, and it will be the last time…because I’m not going to sell this one a fit of stupidity like I did the other two. My current foray into 625-dom is someone’s once-loved USPSA gun, sold when USPSA revolver killed the 625 by allowing 8 shot minor guns (a decision I support, btw).

A revolver tour #7: Smith & Wesson 640 Pro Series

Smith & Wesson 640 Pro Series cylinder open

I have talked about this gun a lot on the blog, and there’s a good reason for that. It’s a really good gun. It’s probably one of the best examples of a carry revolver that you can buy right now; although it is too heavy for pocket carry. But it’s great too shoot, and so long as you have a quality holster, you’re in good shape. Of course, the best thing about this gun? No lock.

Revolver Tour #2: Smith & Wesson 929, the Unicorn

Smith & Wesson 929 cylinder open

Unicorns are mythical beasts, and even though some (crazy) people claim to have seen one, they probably don’t exist. For quite some time after it was announced, the Smith & Wesson 929 occupied the same place as a unicorn: pure myth. But then the myth became reality, and for me that reality was awesome.

Apex Flat-Faced Forward Set Trigger For M&P Pistols

By now you’re likely familiar with the Apex line of upgrades for the M&P pistols. One of their most popular kits has been the forward set sear, which allows you to get one of the nicest, cleanest trigger pulls possible in an M&P. This year, Apex has added an aluminum flat faced trigger to their line up.