Bill Wilson Signature .45 ACP load

For those that don’t know, Wilson Combat has started offering their own line of custom ammo in a variety of calibers, including my favorite caliber .40 S&W.  However, the load I want to direct your attention to is the Bill Wilson Signature load for .45 ACP, which features a 200 grain lead semi-wadcutter bullet at around 875 FPS from a five-inch 1911.  This is the load that Wilson Combat uses to test their pistols with, and I’d be willing to bet that it’s pretty similar to the .45 ACP Major loads that Bill Wilson talks about in his book on the 1911 that he ran during the early days of IPSC.  The .45 ACP Signature load is available at Wilson Combat’s website for $280 plus S&H for 500 rounds.

8 thoughts on “Bill Wilson Signature .45 ACP load”

  1. 56 cents a round for cast lead? What are they smoking? I could load that with a moly bullet and new brass for about half that price. Range brass drops it to about a quarter of that price.

    New WWB at Walmart runs, what $35/100 now? Why would I pay that much more for less (lead vs jacketed)?

  2. Like I said, I could load in virgin starline for about $15/50. $20/box is probably a fair price for this ammo, $28 is silly.

  3. If thats the case caleb then why would you go with 200 gr. instead of 185 gr. ?
    And if we have all learned anything reading what gun writers print then there is no such thing as match quality ammo,maybe consistent quality ammo.Match quality ammo incurs it will be accurate in any gun which is not so,which is why you all tell us to find out which ammo our gun likes.
    I would also dare to say with the quality of todays ammo and not including anything like Tula crap just about anything off the shelf will be good enough for USPSA grant you its a great match but its not Camp Perry for goodness sake .
    No lead round is worth that much money you are only paying for the Wilson name.

  4. Uhm……
    Does he actually ship it loose in bags like that?
    Has he had any blowup in transit yet?
    I’ve seen the stories about ejected brass at a range hitting a primer and setting off a round in a tray, What’s the odds of being slammed around in transit not doing the same?

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