Bianchi Cup Courses of Fire

In case you hadn’t figured it out yet, Bianchi Cup is going to command a significant place on this blog for the time until I shoot the match itself.  Part of that will be me posting up my “training plan” for the various stages that I’ll be shooting.  For those not familiar with the course of fire that comprises the Bianchi Cup, it is made up of the following stages/strings:

7.6 Practical Event – Competitors must fire the 10 yard line segment in the standing position. Competitors may fire the 15, 25, and 50 yard segments in the prone position at their option. This course is divided into four stages. Each stage has three strings and 12 shots per stage. 48 shots:
(a) 10 yards – one shot each target within three seconds, two shots each target within four seconds, and three shots each target eight seconds.
(b) 15 yards – one shot each target within four seconds, two shots each within 5 seconds, and three shots each target within six seconds.
(c) 25 yards – one shot each target five seconds, two shots each target six seconds, and three shots each target seven seconds.
(d) 50 yards – one shot each target seven seconds, two shots each target ten seconds, and three shots each target fifteen seconds.

7.7 Barricade Event – All competitors must fire all stages in the standing position. All competitors may use the barricade for support. No portion of the firearm to rest against the Barricade for Open Modified, Metallic or Production Firearm categories. This course will be divided into four stages, two strings per stage, 6 shots per string, 48 shots; all shots will be tired from behind a barricade:
(a) 10 yards – 6 shots in 5 seconds, 2 strings.
(b) 15 yards – 6 shots in 6 seconds, 2 strings.
(c) 25 yards – 6 shots in 7 seconds, 2 strings.
(d) 35 yards – 6 shots in 8 seconds, 2 strings.

7.8 Moving Target Event (Modified) – Competitors must fire all stages in the standing position. This course will be divided into four stages of 12 shots each, target will travel 60 feet in six seconds. 48 shots:
(a) 10 yards – 6 shots in 6 seconds, 2 strings.
(b) 15 yards – 6 shots in 6 seconds, 2 strings.
(c) 20 yards – 3 shots in 6 seconds, 4 strings.
(d) 25 yards – 3 shots in 6 seconds, 4 strings.

7.9 Falling Plate Event – Competitors must fire the 10 yard line segment in the standing position. Competitors may fire the 15, 20, and 25 yard line segments in the prone position at their option. This course will be divided into four stages; each stage will have two strings, 6 shots per string. 48 shots; targets will be 8″ round metal plates:
(a) 10 yards – 6 shots in 6 seconds, 2 strings.
(b) 15 yards – 6 shots in 7 seconds, 2 strings.
(c) 20 yards – 6 shots in 8 seconds, 2 strings.
(d) 25 yards – 6 shots in 9 seconds, 2 strings

It’s a total of 192 rounds, with a max possible score of 1920 raw points, not counting “X” hits.  Hits on the X ring are often the deciding factor in who wins the Cup, as usually the top shooters will shoot a perfect 1920 (all 10s) on the course.  Last year was the first year in quite some time that the match was not shot “clean” by anyone.

Now for guys shooting the new “Production” division, there is a lot of wild speculation on what would constitute a winning score.  With the limitations placed on sights, the odds of someone shooting the match clean are incredibly slim.  The highest recorded score with an iron-sighted gun was posted by Rob Leatham, with a score of 1910-153x.  I would offer a guess that if someone in the new Production Division shoots an 1750 or better, they’ll be strong in the running to win the Production Division.

Obliquely, that brings me to the first training tip for Bianchi Cup, which originated with Rob Leatham and comes to me second or third hand from a variety of sources: “Get knee deep in brass.”  For my part, I plan to shoot every week (and twice a week if possible) with my competition gun.  While I’ll keep up my regular attendance at local matches, I’m also going to do everything I can to simulate the courses of fire on the Bianchi Cup – including driving out to the family farm so I can shoot at 50 yards to practice for the Practical Event.  The Barricade and Steel Plates I can practice at my local range, but finding a way to simulate the mover presents a problem.  I guess I’ll burn that bridge when I get to it!

1 thought on “Bianchi Cup Courses of Fire”

  1. See, this is why I will never be a serious competitor… It is not that I would not enjoy the shooting, it is that I could not afford it. Oh well :).

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