C&R FFLs under fire

By way of Sebastian, I see that Ryan from Red’s Trading Post is talking about how C&R FFLs could fall under the fire of the ATF.

So the obvious choice will be Curio & Relics Licensees, C&R dealers would be easy targets for the ATF, much like the individuals who held a FFL were in the mid 90’s.

You know, that wouldn’t surprise me even a little bit.  C&R’s would almost be low hanging fruit for the ATF to pick off.  There are a lot of crufflers out there, and I doubt that all of them keep meticulous records.  Of course, if the ATF is looking for reasons to pull your license, even the best kept, most accurate records aren’t going to save your bacon.

We can’t afford to look at what is happening at Red’s and assume that it couldn’t happen to us.  The ATF could quite literally show up at your house and demand to see your Bound Book and your C&R firearms.  God help you if it doesn’t match up.  One of my C&R rules of thumb is that any gun that I get that is C&R eligible I put on my A&D List; even if I didn’t use my C&R FFL to acquire said gun.  Say I buy an SKS at a gun show – that goes on the list.  In the event of an ATF audit, I don’t want there to be any C&R eligible guns in my house that don’t show up on my A&D list.

I’ve accepted that the ATF is completely out of control.  There are good field agents in the agency who actually want to go after real criminals, people who are trafficking illegal automatic weapons in from Mexico – but the bureaucracy  that truly runs the ATF has decided that they’d much rather go after people for paperwork errors than actually chase criminals.

5 thoughts on “C&R FFLs under fire”

  1. Not so much a comment as a request for info. What is an A&D list. thanks for the information. Bill

  2. Sorry, it’s shorthand for Acquisition and Distribution list. Basically, it’s a record of every C&R transaction you’ve ever done, whether a sale or a purchase. It’s also your “Bound Book.”

  3. Ahab,

    That’s more than the rule of thumb, them’s the rules. Even if you don’t use your C&R to acquire it, every single C&R eligible firearm must go into your Bound Book.

    Has led me to seek out numerous sources of serial number searching sites for dates-of-manufacture for some of my acquisitions. Smith & Wesson has great Customer Service for finding out when a gun was made; Colt has a pretty substantial listing of serial numbers and dates of manufacture.

    It’s worth it, though, if for no other reason than getting the dealer price at Brownells/Midway/etc.

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